Monday, June 13, 2016

Houghton hosts over 400 6th graders for Kids2College

Photo - Sixth graders learning about brain waves through the use of an electroencephalogram.
HOUGHTON, NY (June 10, 2016) - During the last two weeks, over 420 sixth-grade students from rural schools in Western New York visited Houghton College to participate in Kids2College, an event meant to expose them to the college experience.
Kids2College is a federally funded grant that focuses on teaching students about the positive impact of college and how their interests and skills can be transformed into a promising and fulfilling future. The Kids2College curriculum and the campus visit serves to help sixth-graders become aware of options beyond high school and see postsecondary education as a real possibility for their own lives.
During the campus visit, sixth-graders from Cuba-Rushford, Scio, Friendship, Belfast, Wellsville and Olean had an opportunity to experience college life for a day. They learned about living in campus housing, recreational opportunities afforded to college students, different areas of study and, of course, dining at the college cafeteria.
“It was awesome!” exclaimed Connor Brown, a student at Wellsville Middle School. “The food was amazing, but the coolest part was learning how to dust for fingerprints.”
Houghton faculty, staff and students designed and led a series of events for the children, including an opportunity to measure brain waves in a psychology station, identify and analyze fingerprints as part of a science session, learn how to carry a beat in music, and develop skills as a communications major. Throughout the day, numerous Houghton students, faculty and staff shared stories about college life and discussed the importance of a college education. Conversations and lectures focused on encouraging sixth-grade students to see their own potential and realize that college is an attainable goal.
Kids2College is administered by the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities, and the campus visit was organized by Dr. Jeff Wiesman, Associate Professor of Education.